Top Therapy Dog Stories 8.31

It’s great to see dogs integrated into new and an increasing number of places. The Ashland Gazette is reporting that Ashland-Greenwood Schools are placing a therapy dog in the classroom for students! They are hosting a breakfast to introduce Rizzo to the community.

Visitors will have the opportunity to meet Rizzo, Ashland-Greenwood Public School’s first therapy dog, during the first Bluejay Breakfast of the 2018-19 school year on Wednesday, Sept. 12 in the middle school/high school cafeteria. – Ashland Gazette

 

Part of a recent post about therapy dogs coming to airports, was this one from The Dallas Morning News (turn off adblocker to read the story), We are becoming increasingly familiar with explosive detection dogs in airports, but now it’s great to see them being available to soothe and comfort stressed-out passengers.

“The goal of the program is to make the traveling experience less stressful and more pleasant,” airport official Ken Whittaker said in a statement.

 

With students going back to school around the country, Huffington Post is reporting on an increase in therapy dogs showing up to relieve the stress of students. University of South Carolina is just one of the many to implement a canine program to help students of any year.

As students returned to the University of South Carolina this year, they were greeted by Indy, a therapy puppy who will soon be a consistent presence on campus, the Raleigh News & Observer reported. Once Indy’s training is complete, she will participate in pet-a-puppy events and hold office hours at the university’s Student Health Services.

 

Finally, Nancy Partridge from the Los Alamos Daily Post writes about Medical Detection Dogs and how they can help detect cancer in patients; as well as the benefits of exposure to animals.

In one study, a Labrador retriever trained in cancer scent detection correctly identified 91 percent of breath samples and 97 percent of stool samples from patients with colon cancer. In another study, a German shepherd identified ovarian cancer malignancies form tissue samples with 90 percent accuracy.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s